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Work Making You Anxious? Thinking Of Quitting?


Each minute of our life is a lesson but most of us fail to read it. I thought I would just add my daily lessons & the lessons that I learned by seeing the people around here. So it may be useful for you and as memories for me.

We all join jobs to earn a good salary which is required for good living. But the pace we are working and living today causes stress. We all know our capability but when the workplace expects to deliver beyond our capability then stress at work occurs. Stress affects a lot of people, and can influence your health. And also we come across colleagues with Anxiety and Depression in team.

Stress and anxiety may seem similar, but they’re not the same. The difference? Stress is a response to daily pressures or a threatening situation, while anxiety is a reaction to the stress. Anxiety, which has no clear cause, tends to last longer and be more difficult to treat. Anxiety can make you feel like a failure and it may make you feel stupid and feel stressed out.

Are you alone getting stressed out in the workplaceHave you ever checked with your friends, how they are feeling in their job? Ask any of your friends, you will get the common answer that “We are all stressed at work”?

Whoever is working, they are feeling the pressure of work-related stress, irrespective of age, experience, gender, and position. Only the level of stress varies from person to person. It’s impossible to get a completely stress-free work environment today.

In today’s work environment, office politics is very common. People are pulling each other’s legs to show-off and make them significant. Frictions happen between employees and it never goes away.

You would have heard that “there is no married relationship without some fights”. In the same way, “there can be no office without politics”.

In earlier days once we leave the office and go home, work did not follow us. But now we have an option to be fully connected to our work, 24 hours a day. It’s your choice to allow it or not.

People who struggle with anxiety often find themselves struggling with low self-esteem. They may have poor confidence in themselves or think they are worthless.Feeling worthless often involves a sense of hopelessness and insignificance. Such feelings are often a common symptom of depression, but can also arise due to things such as low self-esteem, neglect, abuse, trauma, or difficult situations that pose a threat to a person’s sense of self.

A small amount of anxiety helps your body to perform at its best.  An adrenaline kick starts you every morning and keeps you alert throughout the day. However, too much of this stress hormone can exhaust you. Everybody has bad days at work. But if you dread waking up every Monday through Friday, or you regularly find yourself sitting at your desk on the verge of tears, you probably have a more serious problem on your hands. Feeling worthless can create significant distress and make it difficult to function normally in daily life.

Stressed out at Work: Can You Afford to Quit Your Job - Harish Saras

Workplace issues does not stay at work. It creeps into every part of a persons life and can change their whole perception of themselves. It can destroy the self worth of even the most confident people – especially if the workplace does not have the right support systems.

1. Your Skills Are Being Underutilized. Management doesn’t acknowledge that you have more to offer than what you’ve been contributing for a significant amount of time. Perhaps you’ve been passed over for promotion – or your repeated attempts to take on more challenging assignments have failed.

Just be cautious – you should still perform to the best of your ability so that you will have those all-important references for the future.

2. You’re Not Following Your Passion. If you’re not doing what you love, you will never tap your true potential. It will just continue to be “a job,” and eventually each day will seem more of a grind. If you’ve tried re-inventing yourself at the company with a lateral move – or changing your job description to no avail – then it’s time to go back to the roots of what you love. First, however, brush up on your skills to ensure that they are current and marketable.

3. The Boss Keeps Behaving Badly. If you’ve tried everything under the sun to “Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant” boss or co-worker; talked to your boss; your boss’s boss; Human Resources; and your work life is simply unbearable, then it’s time to visit your favorite job board. Just make sure you’re not going from the frying pan into the fire. Through job interviews and other sources, become a sleuth: try to determine how your prospective new boss and employer operates, the culture and management style.

4. The Company is Tanking. The firm has managed to stay afloat during several downsizings, management changes and reorganizations. But if the company consolidates anymore, they could collapse. Recently you heard another department is closing or about another mass exodus. There’s no need to go down with this ship. Put on your life preserver and get in the water.

5. You’re Not Being Fairly Compensated. Downsizing has moved your team into double time, but certainly no where near double compensation. You’ve been made to feel lucky to receive a paycheck. The company might even be performing well, but that is not reflected in your salary or other rewards. You can’t even get an evaluation or your evaluation is not consistent with your true work performance. Perhaps clients have given you excellent feedback, but that is not reflected in your compensation. It may be time to think green (as in more money) or make like a tree and…article continues after advertisement

6. Your Values and the Company’s Are a Mismatch. You feel that there are ethical or moral differences in how the company and you believe the firm should operate; cultural differences; work ethic clashes, and so on. Perhaps its latest product is bad for the environment for example, and you are an avid environmentalist. Whatever the issue, you’re morally misaligned with your employer, and it’s an uncomfortable workplace setting.

7. You Aren’t Being Heard. You can’t seem to: get time with the “powers that be”; get approvals; or get acknowledgment for great work; and over time, projects are no longer coming your way. There may be a changing of the guard at the top; you’re being edged out of projects; or the entire position seems at risk for political or other reasons. Essentially you are being ignored out of a job.

8. The Job is Making You Sick. Instead of jumping out of bed first thing raring to go to work, you feel immobile. You think of ten reasons why you should call in sick because you are sick. Stress, fear or lack of enthusiasm can drain your energy and hurt your performance, creating a lose-lose proposition. When work starts affecting your health…physical, mental, or both, consider taking time off. While you conduct your job search, immediately find healthy ways to reduce stress levels.

9. You’re Surrounded by Egregious Behavior. If you’re the victim of bullying, sexual harassment or other egregious behavior, you should certainly keep an eye out for other positions, regardless of what corrective measures you’re taking. Always consult an employment attorney on such issues. But remember that you should never feel uncomfortable in a job, and that may occur in the long run even if you “win the current battle.” Health does comes first.

10. You Feel You Have More to Contribute Elsewhere. You are in a personal growth mode while your position is stagnant. You’ve been thinking in directions that seem miles apart from the work you’re currently doing. You spend your time imagining what your life would be like “if only.” When you know you have more to offer the world, don’t second-guess yourself – get ready for change.

If you’re facing one or more of these red flags, make sure you’re prepared. Know how to leave gracefully and without burning your bridges. You don’t want to be exposed to unflattering tweets or poor references in this world of instant communication.

You Can Conquer Job Stress | Dr. Chip Roper

“You don’t need anyone’s affection or approval in order to be good enough. When someone rejects or abandons or judges you, it isn’t actually about you. It’s about them and their own insecurities, limitations, and needs, and you don’t have to internalize that. Your worth isn’t contingent upon other people’s acceptance of you—it’s something inherent.” ~Danielle Koepke

If you need a change but feel stuck and are unsure of what to do, you’re not alone. The fear of letting go of a steady paycheck, a predictable routine, and the people and surroundings you have grown accustomed to—warts and all—can be a paralyzing feeling.

The truth is that there will never be an ideal time to say goodbye to your old job and start over. It is almost impossible to create the perfect conditions you think you need in order to start reaching for your career and personal goals. Here’s an analogy: If you believe that every light at every intersection along your journey must be green before you can set out, you’ll be stuck at home forever. The lights are never all green at the same time. That’s just the way life is. But if you venture out to the first intersection and then to the next and then the next, you’ll eventually get to your destination.

Tips Before You Decide to Quit

  • Before you make a decision to quit your job, make sure that you have actually identified the real problem at work.
  • Ask yourself what goals quitting your job will help you achieve. Will the decision to quit bring you closer to your goals?
  • Don’t overestimate or underestimate your capabilities.
  • Give yourself time to think through your decision to quit your job.
  • Make lists. Think of 10 things you can do instead of quitting your job. Then ask yourself if any of those alternatives would be better suited to your current financial or emotional situation.
  • Use mind maps, pens, papers, post-it notes, and file cards to explore your options. Lay the alternatives out on a big table. Move them around. Organize them according to importance.
  • Give yourself credit for making the best decision you can with the information that is available to you.

There is nothing wrong with the way you feel. Judging our emotions is like running into the rainstorm with anger and demanding the sun come out—in other words, a total waste of energy. Instead, use this time wisely. There is a light at the end of the tunnel, even if it seems far away. Often, it is much closer than you think. Use these reminders and practical ways to shift perspective to create some much-needed breathing room.

“Dreams can come true, but there is a secret. They’re realized through the magic of persistence, determination, commitment, passion, practice, focus and hard work. They happen a step at a time, manifested over years, not weeks.” – Elbert Hubbard

Be kind to yourself. Minimize the chatter of the inner critic. Unplug from the negativity and chaos of the world and make small steps in the right direction. As you do, celebrate tiny progress along the way while remembering you are worthy and you have plenty of proof to show yourself that.

As time passes, you’ll wake up and back in a thriving state. You’ll wonder what took you so long to get over this feeling and be equipped with a new perspective and empathy.

CC: @Lynn Taylor

Please feel free to share your story and any lessons you learned, you experienced, you came across in your life in the comments below. If you enjoyed this, or any other other posts, I’d be honoured  if you’d share it with your family, friends and followers!

If you wish to follow my journey outside of my writing, you can find me on LinkedIn and Facebook

 

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Resignation is not a CRIME


Each minute of our life is a lesson but most of us fail to read it. I thought I would just add my daily lessons & the lessons that I learned by seeing the people around here. So it may be useful for you and as memories for me.

Employee Resignation, we know it is inevitable in any organization. Sooner or later, even the best employer has employees resign. The reasons are endless for what causes an employee resignation. But, each employee resignation poses the employer with the same series of questions. Unexpected resignations present big challenges for leaders, managers especially those unaccustomed to dealing with them. It’s probably a frustration you haven’t had for a whileand if you’re a relatively new manager, you might not have ever experienced this before.

As our team members grow in their careers, they may branch out beyond what is available to them in their current role or company. Sometimes, what they are looking for next isn’t something we can offer.  I agree, It’s a dreadful moment when a well-liked member of your team tenders their resignation. You experience a cocktail of emotions ranging from fear about how the rest of the team will react.

illustration-large-resignation-letter Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on January 22, 2020 in Experiences of Life., Work Place

 

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You Can’t FIRE Me! I QUIT!!!


Each minute of our life is a lesson but most of us fail to read it. I thought I would just add my daily lessons & the lessons that I learned by seeing the people around here. So it may be useful for you and as memories for me.

Every time I resign to an organization, a little part of me died. I love to work, but I was made to do that. But I grew wiser as the years rolled by. People around me think “What possible reason would he have to do that?” or, “What’s wrong with him?” or even, “He must be leaving for money. The Fool!” or “He is not the best fit, so he was kicked out” etc. But the reason is simple I want to be myself. I know well, it’s not fair to loose myself for something else which is not important as me.

Although talented employees may join a company, evidence suggests that if they depart prematurely it is often their immediate managers they leave, not the organization itself. Mostly, people don’t change jobs solely for money. They almost never resign on a whim or in a fit of anger. They joined your company because they believed it right for them, and they actually want it to be right. Something, at some point, makes it wrong. And if you really take the time to dig into their real reasons for leaving — and you should — you will find that it’s not “the company” they blame. It’s not the location, or the team, or the database or the air-conditioning. It’s the leadership!  IMG_20150411_172500

Few Great employers start making people feel important on day one. They train their managers to understand the power of paying attention to even the smallest of employee contributions — and, yes, simply saying “thanks” often goes a long way.

Having worked in several organizations under different natured Manager’s, I understood supervisors or manager or leaders, are the main reason for employee to quit his job. We can see many managers with good & bad characteristics. Check your Boss falls under which category

Characteristics of a good manager:

  1. Communicates performance expectations clearly to everybody involved
  2. Gives employees access to the resources they require to do their job right
  3. Stands a role model and guides to learn from mistakes
  4. Frees people up to make a difference by focusing on what they do best
  5. Gives freedom to speak and act
  6. Recognizes team members for their contributions and efforts
  7. Makes everybody feel cared about as an individual
  8. Helps people feel like they have a meaningful participation at work
  9. Encourages employees to grow and develop
  10. Gives employees responsibility and trusts them to get on with the task

Characteristics of bad managers:

  1. Has clear favourite’s and doesn’t maintain neutrality
  2. Is slow to make decisions and often makes a U-turn on them
  3. Lacks the emotional intelligence to deal with difficult situations sensitively
  4. Is a bad listener and lacks general people skills
  5. Lack of provision and technical stuff
  6. Greedy towards positions in organization
  7. Insulting/criticizing in front of others
  8. Doles out assignments but personally doesn’t take any on
  9. Is quick to criticize but slow to praise good efforts
  10. Undermines team morale by focusing on personal objectives instead of the team’s
  11. Is reluctant to transfer skills for fear of training a replacement

imagesB83G1I6YThe common reason why Manager behave like this is they feel insecure of themselves. They are afraid of their team members surpassing them or feel threat of their team members.

Problem starts with the job or workplace that was not as expected. Managers hire in such a big hurry that they don’t take the time to give a realistic preview of the job. Many workers have an unrealistic expectation about the job or workplace or in some cases are deliberately misled during the interviewing process. The employee realizes she has to report to a different boss or won’t be advancing to the next position as soon as expected. Of course, most new hires will quit when they discover the undiscussed realities, resulting in costly turnover.

JOB vs PERSON:  There is a mismatch between job and person. Every Manager should know by now that getting the right people on the bus and into the right seats is a prerequisite for business success. Managers wrongly think that training will transform the wrong people into the right people — that they can put in what was left out. Instead of asking a turkey to climb a tree, we need to learn that it’s better to hire a squirrel.

Lots of companies talk about making their managers better coaches, but more than 60 percent of employees — especially younger ones — say they don’t get enough feedback. We know that many managers just give feedback once a year. That too not genuine feedback. Too many managers have never been well coached themselves. Lacking a good role model, they either give no feedback and coaching at all. Most managers fear giving honest feedback, mainly because they haven’t been trained to do it well.

Workers feel devalued and unrecognized. There are many different reasons why workers may feel devalued: inequality of pay for similar work, not being acknowledged for a job well done, being treated with disrespect, having their differences regarded as negative rather than prized, not receiving the right resources, and having to work in an unacceptable physical work environment are a few. The desire to be recognized, praised, and considered important is our deepest craving, yet 80 percent of employees say they feel ignored or taken for granted.

In addition to ambiguity and an undermining mentality, bad managers also unnecessarily waste time on coordinating and correcting the team, instead of concentrating on helping team members grow. “Managers often make the mistake of focusing on controlling employees, micromanaging them and criticising their efforts,”.  ea33c10116e40052e6d203a6a8f85cf6

People who are well managed are likely to overlook their employer’s shortcomings. Those who work under an ineffective manager, however, are less productive, less content and more likely to leave the company. Sadly, if your career is limited by a poisonous and limiting manager-employee relationship and your pleas fall on deaf ears, moving on might well be the only way to deal with that. If you don’t, it could cost you your career.

“Remember the Golden Rule? “Treat people as you would like to be treated.” The best managers break the Golden Rule every day. They would say don’t treat people as you would like to be treated. This presupposes that everyone breathes the same psychological oxygen as you. For example, if you are competitive, everyone must be similarly competitive. If you like to be praised in public, everyone else must, too. Everyone must share your hatred of micromanagement.”

“There should be leader in every manager, not  manager in every leader.”

Please feel free to share your story and any lessons you learned, you experienced, you came across in your life in the comments below.

 
 

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