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Resignation is not a CRIME


Each minute of our life is a lesson but most of us fail to read it. I thought I would just add my daily lessons & the lessons that I learned by seeing the people around here. So it may be useful for you and as memories for me.

Employee Resignation, we know it is inevitable in any organization. Sooner or later, even the best employer has employees resign. The reasons are endless for what causes an employee resignation. But, each employee resignation poses the employer with the same series of questions. Unexpected resignations present big challenges for leaders, managers especially those unaccustomed to dealing with them. It’s probably a frustration you haven’t had for a whileand if you’re a relatively new manager, you might not have ever experienced this before.

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As our team members grow in their careers, they may branch out beyond what is available to them in their current role or company. Sometimes, what they are looking for next isn’t something we can offer.  I agree, It’s a dreadful moment when a well-liked member of your team tenders their resignation. You experience a cocktail of emotions ranging from fear about how the rest of the team will react.

As with most difficult situations as a manager, how you handle the resignation will affect more than just you. When someone shares news of their resignation, here’s how to handle it with grace and support so they leave with a great lasting impression of you and the organization.

Be supportive: Congratulate them on their new gig and new opportunity. They’ve worked hard to reach this point. Even if you wish they were staying, honor that they’ve accomplished something great in their career, with you by their side. Now it’s time to let the bird fly.

Collaborate and communicate: You can’t control how others react to the news, but you can control how it gets communicated. Be honest and open when communicating the departure to other stakeholders and team. Explain the circumstance in plain language and assure them “you are working hard to find a suitable replacement and doing your best to make the transition as smooth as possible,”.

Thank them for their efforts: Remember all the things they’ve contributed to your company. Highlight the qualities you admire in them. Thank them for their time on your team, and if it’s true, let them know you’ve enjoyed working with them.

Be curious: Now that you have made clear that you are supportive and grateful, it’s safe to get curious about what they’re excited about taking on next. This is also a good time to ask for input on what wasn’t working well in their current role. Many departing employees are reluctant to share any negative feedback on their way out for fear of burning bridges. If that’s the case, look for what drew them to their new role, so you can assess whether that’s something you could have offered but failed to, or not.

Gauge their interest in staying: Sometimes an employee is dissatisfied but not actually ready to leave. They may want to stay but fear the opportunities they are looking for don’t exist on your team. Other times they are hoping for a salary increase and see a job offer as a negotiation tactic. Make sure you understand if they truly want to leave, or if there’s room to explore changes in team, role, or pay that might change their mind. Are they open to staying? Is there more pay or a different opportunity within the team that might meet their’s and your needs? A change in geography? If they’re open to it, continue the conversation.

Transfer knowledge: Now you have some difficult decisions to make about how to divvy up responsibilities while you’re short-staffed. Acknowledge that your team will have a “workload problem” for a time and that people are likely to  “feel overburdened,” but also use the departure as an opportunity to “talk to employees about their careers and opportunities for growth,” . During the exiting employee’s notice period, set up an “extensive shadowing mechanism” so that those taking over his responsibilities can absorb what they need to.

Make a hiring plan: It highly recommended to coordinate with HR to formally list a job opening as soon as possible. This helps people on your team understand that this is temporary,”. Ask employees for input on what skills, experience and qualities they would like to find in the new hire. Perhaps they know people — inside or outside the company — who would be a good fit. Or an internal promotion might be in order, and this could be a chance for someone to expand and grow into the role. It also recommended reconsidering your team configuration. “Ideally you should operate at some level of overcapacity so that when you lose an employee, you don’t need to panic. This little bit of redundancy doesn’t need to cost you more — think about whether you could hire two part-time people instead of one fulltime person.

Remain available to them for the remainder of their time at the company: Don’t cancel one-on-one meetings just because they’re leaving. You want to remain supportive for as long as they are part of your team. This is a sign of respect and the right thing to do. In our increasingly networked professional circles, it’s also the smart thing to do. You never know: they could be your boss someday.

Honor their ultimate decision: Whether they renege on the offer they’d taken or stay committed to leaving the company, honor their decision and assume it’s the right path for them. If they’re going, plan a farewell gathering to thank this person for their hard work.

Don’t be hard on yourself: Remember that when someone leaves, it doesn’t always mean we’ve done a bad job (though definitely poke into what’s causing their departure). Sometimes it can mean we’ve done a great job in preparing them for what’s next, and they’re ready for bigger and better opportunities thanks to you that may not be available to them in your current company. If their needs could have been met on your team, take this as a learning opportunity. Think about how you can better support your existing team and how you’ll set the next person in this role up for success. And then, it’s time to move on.

Have a party: On the employee’s last day, it’s important to gather your team to “thank the person who’s leaving and wish them well,” . It doesn’t have to be a big party; it could be coffee and donuts in the conference room. But the act of celebration is key. After all, “it’s not only about the person who is leaving. It’s also about the people who are staying,” You are rewarding the people for whom it’s going to be a difficult few weeks.” Failing to acknowledge an employee’s departure and his or her contributions sends a bad message to your team. It’s important to humanize the work relationship.

Sample, Thank you note “MunnaPrawin is leaving us to pursue new opportunities at @ *$&/ company. His last day in our Organization is Feb 14. Please join me in wishing Mary tremendous success in his future endeavors. Please join us to wish Prawin success in his new employment and to say good-bye.”

Principles to Remember:

Do´s

  • Immediately develop a hiring plan to replace the employee
  • Frame the resignation as an opportunity for remaining team members to take on new responsibilities and learn new things
  • Publicly acknowledge the employee’s departure and his contributions to the team

Dont´s

  • Take the resignation personally; instead, retain your relationship with the employee by engaging in a friendly conversation about future plans
  • Try to counter-offer unless it’s absolutely necessary — you’ll have more success if you wait a year and then try to recruit them back
  • Be blindsided again. Make an effort to talk to your team about their professional interests and needs

Support Your Employees, No Matter Where They Are

In the end, remember that the business of losing an employee is more than just, well, business. No matter the circumstances, make sure you both leave on good terms. Wish her well in her new position, offer to be a reference in the future, and encourage her to keep in touch. Even if her performance wasn’t the greatest during those last two weeks, there’s no need to burn that bridge—you never know when you’ll cross paths again in the future.

Losing an employee (especially a great one) is tough—but as a manager, you’ll have to face it sooner or later. So, it’s best to be prepared with a plan of action—and, of course, a heartfelt card and farewell cake can always help ease the pain, too.

Why is it that when someone resigns they are treated like an enemy? Life is too short. Be happy for others and happiness will always surround you. Agree?

When an employee resigns:
1) Thank them for all their contributions.
2) Treat them with respect.
3) Wish them the best.

No matter how educated, talented, which position you hold, rich or cool you believe you are, how you treat others tells all. Integrity is everything.

Please feel free to share your story and any lessons you learned, you experienced, you came across in your life in the comments below. If you enjoyed this, or any other other posts, I’d be honored if you’d share it with your family, friends and followers!

 
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Posted by on January 22, 2020 in Experiences of Life., Work Place

 

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Toxic Co-Workers


Each minute of our life is a lesson but most of us fail to read it. I thought I would just add my daily lessons & the lessons that I learned by seeing the people around here. So it may be useful for you and as memories for me.

Article by an Annoyed Employee in IT..

You can pick your friends; you can pick your job. But you can’t pick your colleagues any more than you can the next assignment to come down from upper management. It’s no surprise, then, that not every colleague is a good one.

The first, and by far the best, kind of co-workers are the nice ones. You know, the ones who are always quick to offer you a hand whenever you need one. They’re friendly, helpful, and normal to your standards. With them, everything’s peachy! You have absolutely no complaints when it comes to the nice co-workers. Heck, they may be the only aspect of the workplace that’s keeping you sane!

The next category is toxic co-workers. They may be disguised as nice co-workers or even weird, annoying, or obnoxious co-workers, but they actually belong in a whole different category. Those co-workers are out to intentionally or unintentionally hurt your career, and you need to avoid them at all costs. 2013_bsl_CopeToxicWorkers_01

Greed, laziness, selfishness and backstabbing behaviors are an all-too-common part of many company cultures. Often, the people who personify these behaviors within organizations step on the colleagues who are just trying to put in an honest day’s work—so they can get ahead or get out of pulling their load—and it’s time to call them out.

The backstabber: Watch out for this one – he might appear to be on your side, but behind your back he will bad mouth you, lie about you and may be out to destroy you. The backstabber tries to make himself look good at your expense – by making you look bad. Pay attention to how you feel around this person and what you hear; seek clarification if you’re getting mixed signals.

The Politician. Promotions based on merit are not what these schmoozers believe in. Instead, they participate in office politics—popping in the boss’s office every five minutes, declaring their indispensable worth. The Politician is consumed with company politics. Her work life becomes a game in which she is constantly trying to “win” the next job, the next promotion, the next project. However, she spends little or no time fulfilling her current responsibilities.

The time sucker: This is someone who doesn’t think about the schedules and time of others. This employee will simply show up at your workstation to ask questions and go on tangents, with no consideration for your time, prior commitments, deadlines, etc.

The gossiper: Keep in mind that those who gossip to you will gossip about you. It doesn’t hurt to listen to what you hear – just don’t participate in the conversation. Often, the industry grapevine is true, but the gossiper tends to exaggerate, so beware. Some people feel they’ll make themselves look better by spreading information, especially about someone else. The good news is that most people catch on to this tactic, but not always before damage is done.

The Taskmaster. Have you ever come across someone at work who spends all of his time worrying about what everyone else is doing, while at the same time complaining that no one else in the company ever does anything and that he is saddled with all the work? This is the Taskmaster. Taskmasters are quick to assign tasks to other people to avoid having to do anything—and yet as soon as a task is completed, somehow the Taskmaster is there to take credit for getting it done. The Taskmaster constantly works to create the perception that he is so busy that he just couldn’t possibly work one more thing into his day.

The credit-robber: There are people who take credit for other people’s ideas in order to shine the light on themselves, no matter whom they steal from to do it. The credit-robber usually steals the spotlight when you least suspect it, and in front of others. Being caught off-guard makes it difficult to know how to respond and, by the time you catch your breath, you’ve lost your moment.

The unsupportive supervisor: This is a tough one: When you don’t have your supervisor on your side, you’re on your own. Many supervisors feel threatened by their staff; some thrive on the power they feel from making others feel small. You must be very careful when the problem is your supervisor – as with any negative scenario, you need to take a step back to evaluate the situation and do everything you can to protect yourself.

For most of us, working in an office can offer a pleasant, exciting, and motivating path to a successful career. However, sometimes we encounter unprofessional, unhappy, and downright hostile colleagues. When there are unhealthy people within your organization, you’re not just fighting the market and your competitors, you’re now fighting internal battles between teams and individuals just to get something done.

You can pick your friends, you can pick your job. But you can’t pick your colleagues. It’s all up to us how wisely we react and handle the Toxic Co-workers at work environment.

Please feel free to share your story and any lessons you learned, you experienced, you came across in your life in the comments below.

 

 
 

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